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Arts and Sciences (AR), Fine Arts (FA), and First-Year Seminar (FY SEM)

These courses are designed to improve basic skills, to provide knowledge and direction essential to success in college and later life, and to provide enrichment opportunities in the arts.  Besides those described below, other courses in the academic departments serve the same objective.  Among them are courses in composition and rhetoric (EN 103, 111-112, 114-116), basic speech communication (CO 100), Word Power through the Classics (CL 210), and Introduction to Careers (CE 101).

Students may apply a maximum of four 1-credit AR courses, and a maximum of four 1-credit FA courses, toward graduation.  Unless otherwise specified, no more than eight 1-credit courses from any combination of courses in Arts and Sciences (AR), Communication (CO) 140-175, Career Education (CE), Fine Arts (FA), and/or Physical Education (PE) 120-174 may be applied toward graduation.  Except for AR 291, credits from these courses may not be used to satisfy Core or major requirements.

First-Year Seminar (FY SEM)

Chair of First-Year Seminar Committee for Fall 2009: Dr. Paul Shick (MT)

FY SEM 3 cr.  Introduction to the academic life which focuses on the perennial questions of human experience, utilizes an interdisciplinary approach to those questions, and promotes active learning among both students and faculty.  This seminar encourages students to question and clarify their values as they simultaneously develop their oral, written, problem solving, and critical thinking skills.  Faculty are drawn from all academic departments.  This course is required of all first-year students.

Arts and Sciences (AR)
105. SEMINAR IN ACADEMIC SUCCESS 1 cr.   Designed to help students develop an awareness and understanding of techniques and services that should aid in their academic success.  The course will meet for seven weeks and cover such topics as time management, stress management, and academic support services.
112. APPLIED STRATEGIC LEARNING 1 cr.  Application of principles of cognitive learning theory.  Strategic learning strategies used to improve academic performance.
121. SURVEY OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS 0-1 cr.  Introduces students to the many career options available in healthcare.  The class meets once weekly and includes speakers representing various healthcare professions as well as informational lectures and self-assessment in the form of preparing an individual development plan.
122. INTERNSHIP IN MEDICAL-RELATED FIELDS 3 cr.  A nine-week internship that provides students with the opportunity to work and learn alongside experienced medical professionals at the Cleveland Clinic and its facilities in areas such as nursing, pharmacy, radiology, respiratory therapy, and medical technology.  Students who have an interest in a medical field receive individually structured, full-time learning experiences and research opportunities during the summer.  Participants are required to work Monday through Friday, forty hours per week for each of the nine weeks of the program.
140. PERSPECTIVES ON EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP 1 cr.  Open to students in the Leadership Scholars Program or by permission of chair.  Establishes a framework for understanding leaders and leader behavior.  In particular, the course explores issues relevant to the psychology of leadership and increases student awareness of the characteristics, attributes, values, communication styles, and problem-solving skills that make effective leadership possible.  Students will also evaluate and/or apply leadership concepts from a student and professional perspective.
144. LEADERSHIP AND SOCIAL JUSTICE FIRST-YEAR PRACTICUM 1 cr.  Prerequisites:  admission to the Leadership and Social Justice Learning Community and first-year standing.  Participation in and preparation for the “We the People” project. Pass/fail.  Course may be repeated once.
150A. ARRUPE SCHOLARS FOR SOCIAL ACTION ORIENTATION 1 cr.  Prerequisites:  admission to Arrupe Scholars program and first-year status.  Orientation to principles of Arrupe Scholars and John Carroll University. Includes service experience, reflection processes and strategies, and development of e-portfolio.
150B. ARRUPE SCHOLARS FOR SOCIAL ACTION FIRST-YEAR PRACTICUM      1 cr.  Prerequisites:  admission to Arrupe Scholars program and first-year status.  Examination of a social justice issue that leads from service to advocacy.
171. INTERDISCIPLINARY SCIENCE 3-4 cr.  Corequisite:  AR 171L.  Interdisciplinary approach to science teaching in elementary school.  Topics include concepts in biology, chemistry, and physics.  Course coordinated by science departments and the Department of Education and Allied Studies.
171L. INTERDISCIPLINARY SCIENCE LAB 0 cr.  Corequisite:  AR 171.  Laboratory experiments illustrating concepts and procedures developed in AR 171.
198. SPECIAL TOPICS 0 cr.  Specific content announced in the schedule of classes.
200. CROSS REGISTRATION 1-6 cr.  An administrative holding number used to facilitate cross-registration with other Cleveland-area institutions.  Credit assigned to proper academic department on submission of transcript.  Program described on page 118.
203. PROBLEM SOLVING 1 cr.  Creative methods in problem solving. The student gains insight into how one thinks and how to modify one’s thinking to be comfortable when confronted with a problem, thereby increasing chances for finding a solution.
244. LEADERSHIP AND SOCIAL JUSTICE LEARNING COMMUNITY SOPHOMORE PRACTICUM EXPERIENCE. 1 cr.  Prerequisites:  admission to the Leadership and Social Justice Learning Community and sophomore standing.  Participation in and preparation for the “We, the People” project.  Course may be repeated once.
245. LEADERSHIP AND SOCIAL JUSTICE LEARNING COMMUNITY SOPHOMORE PRACTICUM EXPERIENCE 1 cr.  Prerequisites:  admission to the Leadership and Social Justice Learning Community and sophomore standing.  Development of knowledge about social justice issues and leadership skills.
250. ARRUPE SCHOLARS FOR SOCIAL ACTION: SOLIDARITY IN MISSION 1 cr.  Prerequisites:  admission to Arrupe Scholars program and second-year status.  Development of understanding of integration between curricular and co-curricular experience.  Students participate in Student Speaker’s Bureau.  Continued development of student portfolio.
290. CULTIVATING COMMUNITY 3 cr.  A multi-disciplinary course that develops students’ awareness of the human condition.  Students then are challenged to engage their community and work for positive change.
291. JUSTICE AND DEMOCRACY IN A GLOBAL CONTEXT 3 cr.  Interdisciplinary course taught by two or more faculty from the Departments of Religious Studies, Political Science, and History.  Focus on the interaction of religion and politics in specific historical contexts. Specific topics will vary by semester but typically will include themes related to the construction of religious, racial, and national identities; the roots of violence and conflict resolution; the articulation of differences and the promotion of democracy and justice.  Designed for prospective majors in the Departments of Religious Studies, Political Science, and History, and applicable to major requirements in each of these departments. 
295. LIFE AT THE POVERTY LINE 3 cr.  Seminar-style course that addresses the causal factors linked to prolonged and systemic poverty, as well as the impact of poverty on individuals and institutions; also examines the ideological bases of concepts such as “solidarity with the poor,” “preferential option for the poor,” and distributive justice.  Lectures, readings, discussions and films help students analyze domestic and global poverty.
296. IMMERSION EXPERIENCE 1 cr.  Faculty-directed/led immersion experience of a minimum of 5 days that requires students to integrate pre-immersion experience readings/academic literature with the immersion experience in a research paper format.
297. CULTIVATING COMMUNITY PRACTICUM 1 cr.  Prerequisites:  completion of Cultivating Community and instructor permission.  Helps students develop research as well as communication skills within the setting of the Cultivating Community course.  Students will be expected to enhance skills in leading discussions, presenting academic work in public, conducting independent research, and writing a clear, well-argued essay.
298. IMMERSION TRIP 1 cr.  Prerequisite:  instructor permission.  Fourth-credit option for students participating in immersion experiences linked to an academic course.
300. STUDY ABROAD 1-16 cr.  An administrative holding number used to facilitate study-abroad registration at those institutions that participate in a special consortial agreement with John Carroll University.  Program described on pages 121-122.
340. EXPERIENCES IN LEADERSHIP AND SOCIETY 1 cr.  Open to students in the Leadership Scholars Program or by permission of chair.  Includes 3-5 meetings during the semester to discuss leadership concepts and a 6-8 week leader shadowing experience in the community.  Focuses on developing an understanding of leadership from an organizational or community perspective.  Students are encouraged to observe and interact with leaders outside of class to prepare themselves for the complex and practical demands of leading others.
344. LEADERSHIP AND SOCIAL JUSTICE LEARNING COMMUNITY JUNIOR PRACTICUM EXPERIENCE 1 cr.  Prerequisites: admission to the Leadership and Social Justice Learning Community and junior standing.  Participation in and preparation for the “We, the People” project.  Pass/fail.  Course may be repeated once.
345. LEADERSHIP AND SOCIAL JUSTICE INTERNSHIP 1 cr.  Prerequisites:  admission to the Leadership and Social Justice Learning Community and junior standing.  Internship experience with a non-profit, government agency, or corporation to develop understanding of leadership skills and social justice issues in the community.
350. ARRUPE SCHOLARS FOR SOCIAL ACTION JUNIOR EXPERIENCE 1 cr.  Prerequisites:  admission to the Arrupe Scholars program and third-year status.  Portfolio development; participation in Celebration of Scholarship; and service experience.
399. POVERTY & SOLIDARITY INTERNSHIP 3 cr.  Prerequisites:  acceptance into the Poverty and Solidarity summer internship program and instructor permission.  Internship with a community organization that addresses poverty.  Includes a final project under faculty supervision that integrates internship activities, academic work, and personal reflection.
444. LEADERSHIP AND SOCIAL JUSTICE LEARNING COMMUNITY SENIOR PRACTICUM EXPERIENCE 1 cr.  Prerequisites:  admission to the Leadership and Social Justice Learning Community and senior standing.  Participation in and preparation for the “We, the People” project.  Pass/fail.  Course may be repeated once.
445. LEADERSHIP AND SOCIAL JUSTICE SENIOR CAPSTONE 1 cr. Prerequisites:  admission to the Leadership and Social Justice Learning Community and senior standing.  Synthesizes students’ learning about leadership and social justice from curricular and co-curricular experiences.
450. ARRUPE SCHOLARS FOR SOCIAL ACTION SENIOR CAPSTONE 1 cr.  Prerequisites:  admission to Arrupe Scholars program and senior status.  Synthesis of students’ experience as Arrupe Scholars for Social Action.  Portfolio presentation.
499.  SENIOR SEMINAR 3 cr.  Program Evaluation and Policy Studies in Africana Studies.  Students taking AR 499 will be required to apply their studies to developing a policy paper on an issue relevant to African Diaspora Studies, or African-American Studies.  Required of all Africana Students planning to complete the concentration.

Fine Arts (FA)
Lecturers:  C. Caporella, M. Hoehler, A. Mentschukoff
Music performance courses require participation and training in vocal groups, band, or other ensemble activities within the University.  Performance ensembles at John Carroll are open to all who are interested in choral and band experiences.  Some groups require an audition before admittance.  Students may choose to receive elective credit per semester (up to a maximum of 4 credits) for participation in one of the choirs, or join the choirs or bands on a voluntary, non-credit basis. 

Choral Ensembles  

109C. CECILIA SINGERS 1 cr.  A women’s vocal ensemble that explores, prepares, and performs a variety of repertoire from sacred and secular genres.  The choir performs at concerts both on and off campus.  Audition required.
109D. UNIVERSITY SCHOLA CANTORUM 1 cr.  A select vocal ensemble that performs sacred and secular literature throughout the academic year.  Students will explore, prepare, and perform music literature from a variety of musical periods spanning chant and polyphony through standard sacred repertoire, contemporary sacred and popular tunes, madrigals, a cappella, and vocal jazz.  Venues include major concerts and liturgical celebrations on and off campus, such as the Parents’ Weekend Concert and the Christmas Carroll Eve concert as well as special University events throughout the academic year.  Audition required.
109E. UNIVERSITY CHAPEL ENSEMBLE 1 cr. A vocal and instrumental ensemble that offers liturgical music for liturgies and prayer services on campus.  Students will explore, prepare, and perform sacred and liturgical music literature from a variety of musical periods, focusing on contemporary liturgical and praise songs. The choir rehearses on Sunday at 9 p.m. in the St. Francis Chapel and then performs at the 10 p.m. Mass. 
109F. CANTORS AT JCU 0 cr.  Vocalists who regularly lead the singing at worship services and liturgies on campus.  A primary focus of the ministry of cantor is to proclaim the psalm through song.  Audition required.
109G. GOSPEL CHOIR 0 cr.  A choral ensemble that offers a wide selection of traditional Gospel, spirituals, and contemporary Gospel praise.  Musical performances, including John Carroll’s Martin Luther King Jr. celebration, are held both on and off campus.
109H. UNIVERSITY CHORUS 1 cr. A vocal ensemble open to all students, faculty, staff, administrators and alumni.  This performance group will explore, prepare, and perform large-scale choral works.  The choir performs at concerts on campus, including the annual sacred music concert held in the spring semester.
109J. CARROLL SINGERS 1 cr.  A vocal ensemble that performs a variety of music in the popular venue, along with some sacred works.  The group will explore, prepare, and perform music literature from several musical styles.  Literature may include Broadway, vocal jazz, popular tunes, and Renaissance music.  The choir will sing at concerts, such as the Parents’ Weekend Concert and the Christmas Carroll Eve Concert.

Instrumental Ensembles
110A. JCU PEP BAND 0 cr.   An ensemble that enthusiastically supports the Blue Streaks athletic teams and enhances a game’s atmosphere. Musicians of all degrees of experience are welcome.
110B. JCU JAZZ BAND 0 cr.  An ensemble that plays an array of classic and contemporary stage band pieces in various styles at concerts on campus and area jazz festivals.  Informal audition required.
110C. JCU WIND ENSEMBLE 0 cr.  A concert band that begins practice in October in preparation for a holiday concert and resumes rehearsals in the spring for a spring concert.  Rehearsals begin when Pep Band rehearsals have ended.

Applied Music
110E. BEGINNING CLASSROOM GUITAR 1 cr. Introduction to various guitar styles; emphasis on reading music and guitar technique.  Basic music theory.
110F. INTERMEDIATE CLASSROOM GUITAR 1 cr.  Analysis of guitar styles focusing on folk and flamenco.  Music theory.
110G. ADVANCED CLASSROOM GUITAR 1 cr.  Refinement of guitar styles, including classical.  Advanced music theory.
110H. ADVANCED BEGINNING CLASSROOM GUITAR 1 cr.  Development of various guitar styles; emphasis on reading music and guitar technique. Basic music theory.
115. CLASS VOICE 1-2 cr.  The art of vocal production with individual attention in a class setting.  Fundamentals of singing, including posture, breathing, tone production, diction, and song interpretation.  Students are required to give several solo performances in class during the semester.
299. A, B, C. DIRECTED INSTRUMENTAL STUDY 1-3 cr.  Advanced students.  Individually directed study of an instrument.  Requires audition and approval of instructor.

General Music
114. MUSIC APPRECIATION 1-3 cr.  Introductory music course designed to enhance the knowledge of music and the art of analytical, perceptive listening.  Explores sources and mediums of musical sound, basic elements of music and historical periods of music.  Class attendance at local music concerts is required.
199. SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 cr.  Topics in fine arts.  Specific topic announced in schedule of classes or may be taken with permission as an individual project under supervision.

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